All

Appwrite Tiger Globalsawersventurebeat

For the past few months, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has completed a massive effort to identify, survey and characterize the ume-vieira mantisfish bloom in the Greater Mississippi Sound. The goal was to determine whether or not there is an established zoonotic bloom that could be introduced into U.S. waters via fishing or other human-related exposure to ume-vieira fish. Sufferers of nausea, fatigue and other gastrointestinal problems are encouraged to attend this scientific expedition as they will likely recover from the stress of analyzing and categorizing the ume-vieira mantisfish bloom data and provide insight on potential human exposure factors in our environment. However, those who are not affected by digestive problems should continue to enjoy their favorite foods without worry as we feature some exciting new information on page 18 of this report: What You Need To Know About The Ume-Vieira Mantis Fish Bloom In The Mississippi Sound .

What is the Ume-Vieira Mantisfish Bloom?

The ume-vieira is a commercially bred species of tropical fish endemic to Indian and African waters. The species is known to grow up to a 5 foot length with a wide gape, a red coloration and a bite that can be extremely strong. The species is preyed upon by a variety of aquatic and terrestrial species including coral reefs and fishes. As a result of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s aggressive efforts to remove the species from the Great Lakes, the species was listed as a vulnerable species in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) 2014 list of Threatened Species.

Why Is There A Bloom In The Mississippi Sound?

The reason why the ume-vieira is blooming in the Mississippi is interesting. The species is endemic to the Great Lakes, which is the most populated island in the western hemisphere. The bloom is believed to be the result of an over-exploitation of the species that has led to its decline in the wild populations in both the Great Lakes and the Caribbean. The species is also sensitive to changes in both global climate and human-induced changes in the environment.

What Can Be Done About This Bloom?

The ume-vieira should not be confused with the kiwi mantis fish, which are unrelated to the popular American mantis fish. The former is under-exploited and escapes the Great Lakes in large numbers; the latter is a serious problem due to over-exploitation and overexploitation due to domestic fishing and other human-induced activities. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recommends that the public keep these species in mind when considering their potential human exposure factors in the environment.

How to Get to the Bloom: From Here to Your Home

Both the state and federal coasts are hosting the bloom now. The state’s coast guard activities have been triggered by concerns that the species may become a breeding ground for fish and wildlife. The bloom is expected to continue for at least the next few months. If you are able togeather, you can monitor the bloom for changes and head to the nearest coast to observe for yourself what is happening. To minimize the impact of exposure to the bloom on your health, eat only fresh aquatic plants and avoid exposure to the air and water while swimming, surfing, boat rides or fishing. Bring water purification tablets or drink accessories like drink bottles with non-chemical filters. And when possible, keep your boat at least 50 feet from the ocean.

Conclusion

The final step in the process of getting rid of the ume-vieira Mantisfish bloom is to monitor the water quality in the Greater Mississippi Sound. If the water is not clear or turbid, then it is likely that the species is present in great abundance. The best course of action would be to remove the bloom and allow it to die back to the environment. Although the bloom itself does not pose a significant health threat to humans, the presence of the bloom in the water near where the solution for the problem is found poses a serious potential health risk to aquatic life. This study provides insight into potential human exposure to the ume-vieira mantis fish bloom in the Mississippi Sound. The presence of a bloom can be monitored for changes in water quality, threats to the bloom and the potential for human exposure to the species. The article concludes that potential for exposure is significant due to over-exploitation of the species, inadequate regulation of water bodies and the adoption of sustainable fisheries management strategies in the U.S.

References

Aguilar F, Saint-Denis J, Murphy KE, et al. (2012) Narrow-body depth-profiling: A new method for characterizing the aquatic environment. Oceanogr Sec Lett 175:1-6. Arendt JT, Beaman RJ, Haeussler JV, et al. (2009) The impact of changes in human activities on the U.S coral reef: A review. World J Parks 20:80-110. Berkowitz P, Lienhard J, Naber D, et al. (2014) Zoonotic fishes: A guide for scientists, scientists, and the public. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons. Bishop M, Parker S (2009) The impact of human-induced climate change on coral reefs: A review. Coral Reefs 21:13-23. Blume G, Schleiffervox R, Haindl A (2012) Ume-vieira: The new ‘king of the fishes’?. Trends Ecol Evol 22:165-171. Breck LM, Olson KE, Blumenstein G (2014) The impact of climate change and fisheries management on coral reefs: A review. Earth Sciences 60:237-245. Carr J, Ritchie LP, Pelle C, et al. (2006) Nemo, the first coral reef fish: A history of evolution, genetic analyses and fisheries management.oon. Oceans 24:947-966. Carr J, Ritchie LP, Pelle C, et al. (2015) The status of coral reefs worldwide: A report of the trade group of the World Organization for the Conservation of Migratory Species (Oceans). Oceans 118:S39-S51. Clayborne C (1986) The cichlid fishes of the world: A field guide, 4th ed. Westport, CT: Praeger. Cohen NW (1972) The cichlid fishes of the United States: A guide to the wild and fish guard pans. Baltimore: American Cichlid Society. Cohen NW (1973) The cichlid fishes of the world: A color encyclopedia, 2nd ed. Baltimore: American Cichlid Society. Cohen NW (1974) The cichlid fishes of the world: A guide to the wild and fish guard areas. Baltimore: American Cichlid Society. Cohen NW (1975) The cichlid fishes of the world: A color encyclopedia, 2nd ed. Baltimore: American Cichlid Society. Cohen NW (1976) The cichlid fishes of the world: A guide to the wild and fish guard areas. Baltimore: American Cichlid Society. Cohen NW (1977) The cichlid fishes of the world: A color encyclopedia, 2nd ed. Baltimore: American Cichlid Society. Cohen NW (1978) The cichlid fishes of the world: A guide to the wild and fish guard areas. Baltimore: American Cichlid Society. Cohen NW (1979) The cichlid fishes of the world: A color encyclopedia, 2nd ed. Baltimore: American Cichlid Society. Cohen NW (1980) The cichlid fishes of the world: A color encyclopedia, 2nd ed. Baltimore: American Cichlid Society. Cohen NW (1981) The cichlid fishes of the world: A guide to the wild and fish guard areas. Baltimore: American Cichlid Society. Cohen NW (1982) The cichlid fishes of the world: A color encyclopedia, 2nd ed. Baltimore: American Cichlid Society. Cohen NW (1983) The cichlid fishes of the world: A color encyclopedia, 2nd ed. Baltimore: American C

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Back to top button